Archive for February 20, 2014

Double Indemnity – Statistics Noir

Posted in Film with tags , , , , on February 20, 2014 by telescoper

The other day I decided to treat myself by watching a DVD of the  film  Double Indemnity. It’s a great movie for many reasons, not least because when it was released in 1944 it immediately established much of the language and iconography of the genre that has come to be known as film noir, which I’ve written about on a number of occasions on this blog; see here for example. Like many noir movies the plot revolves around the destructive relationship between a femme fatale and male anti-hero and, as usual for the genre, the narrative strategy involves use of flashbacks and a first-person voice-over. The photography is done in such a way as to surround the protagonists with dark, threatening shadows. In fact almost every interior in the film (including the one shown in the clip below) has Venetian blinds for this purpose. These chiaroscuro lighting effects charge even the most mundane encounters with psychological tension or erotic suspense.

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To the left is an example still from Double Indemnity which shows a number of trademark features. The shadows cast by venetian blinds on the wall, the cigarette being smoked by Barbara Stanwyck and the curious construction of the mise en scene are all very characteristic of the style. What is even more wonderful about this particular shot however is the way the shadow of Fred McMurray’s character enters the scene before he does. The Barbara Stanwyck character is just about to shoot him with a pearl-handled revolver; this image suggests that he is already on his way to the underworld as he enters the room.

I won’t repeat any more of the things I’ve already said about this great movie, but I will say a couple of things that struck me watching it again at the weekend. The first is that even after having seen it dozens of times of the year I still found it intense and gripping. The other is that I think one of the contributing factors to its greatness which is not often discussed is a wonderful cameo by Edward G Robinson , who steals every scene he appears in as the insurance investigator Barton Keyes. Here’s an example, which I’ve chosen because it provides an interesting illustration of the the scientific use of statistical information, another theme I’ve visited frequently on this blog:

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