Archive for December 23, 2014

The Cliffs of Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko

Posted in The Universe and Stuff with tags , , on December 23, 2014 by telescoper

I don’t often post pictures from the excellent Astronomy Picture of the Day but today’s is so beautiful I couldn’t resist.

cometcliffs_rosetta_960

Image Credit & Licence (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO): ESA, Rosetta spacecraft, NAVCAM; Additional Processing: Stuart Atkinson

The explanation published with the picture goes:

These high cliffs occur on the surface of a comet. They were discovered to be part of the dark nucleus of Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko (CG) by Rosetta, a robotic spacecraft launched by ESA which began orbiting the comet in early August. The ragged cliffs, as featured here, were imaged by Rosetta about two weeks ago. Although towering about one kilometer high, the low surface gravity of Comet CG would likely make a jump from the cliffs, by a human, survivable. At the foot of the cliffs is relatively smooth terrain dotted with boulders as large as 20 meters across. Data from Rosetta indicates that the ice in Comet CG has a significantly different deuterium fraction — and hence likely a different origin — than the water in Earth’s oceans. The Rosetta spacecraft is scheduled to continue to accompany the comet as it makes its closest approach to the Sun in 2015 August.

For me, Rosetta has undoubtedly been the science highlight of the year. It has been an absolute triumph, and it’s not over yet as Rosetta will now follow the comet on its journey towards the Sun. With a bit of luck, the lander Philae will also awaken (hopefully in March) as the Sun begins to shine more brightly on its solar panels.

I think we should all wish a special Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to everyone involved with this wonderful adventure!

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