Butetown’s Baltic Missions

More on Cardiff history, this time the Baltic connections..

History On The Dole

German Seamen's Pastors, 1906. Julius Jungclaussen is in the front row, fourth from the right (with the full white beard). German Seamen’s Pastors, 1906. Julius Jungclaussen is in the front row, fourth from the right (with the full white beard).

With today’s blog, the next in the current series looking at the overseas Seamen’s Missions in Cardiff in the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, I want to turn my attention to some of the more hidden and unknown aspects of this rich organisational-religious culture in the port. The Norwegian Church and the Greek Orthodox Church, both of which still stand, and in the case of the latter still serves the community as a religious building, are well-known. Their history, if often misreported in certain details, is at least known about by those familiar with Cardiff’s multicultural past. Less well-known, and in some cases perhaps almost completely unknown, are the missions that served the Dutch, Estonian, Finnish, German, and Latvian, communities that settled in the port and were bolstered by regular…

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