Notes from Euclid 2019

I’ve just had my breakfast so I thought I’d do a quick post before the start of play on of the 2019 Euclid Consortium Meeting in Helsinki. Previous Euclid Consortium meetings were held in: Bologna (2011); Copenhagen (2012); Leiden (2013); Marseille (2014); Lausanne (2015); Lisbon (2016); London (2017); and Bonn (2018). I’ve only attended the last two: I was non-Euclidean before that.

Finlandia Hall

The venue is the Finlandia Hall, which looks splendid from the outside. I passed it during my stroll yesterday afternoon just so I could be sure where it is. It’s easy to find as it is very central and on the edge of a lake next to a major thoroughfare (Mannerheimintie). . I arrived yesterday to beautiful sunny weather but that has changed – it is pouring down as I write this, with thunder and lightning to boot. I don’t have to leave the Hotel for an hour or so, however, so perhaps it will have passed. There’s no sign of that just yet but I brought a brolly, and it’s only 15 minutes away from the Hotel on foot.

According to the web page there are 408 participants at the last count. I expect there’ll be quite a few people I know here but I haven’t met any yet. The Euclid Consortium has well over a thousand members, but obviously they’re not all here this week. I seem still to be the only representative of Ireland.

There’s a nice webpage showing all the institutions around the world who belong to the consortium behind the European Space Agency’s Euclid Mission. Here’s a screen grab that shows all the logos of all the institutions involved in this very large Consortium:

There are so many that it’s hard to see them all, but if you look very closely about half way down, among the Ms, you will see Maynooth University among them. Ireland is a member state of the European Space Agency, by the way.

Top tips for participants include not to tip:

Here is the latest timeline for the Euclid mission: launch around June 2022 followed by six years of operations.

If you want to follow on Twitter the relevant hashtag is #Euclid2019.

10 Responses to “Notes from Euclid 2019”

  1. Sesh Nadathur Says:

    That’s not a lake, it’s the sea.

    • telescoper Says:

      It looks like a lake because it does not seem to be connected to the sea, but I guess the connection must be under the railway lines..

  2. Euclid sounds like a great project. Is there a hope that it will resolve the issue of dark matter?

    • shantanu Says:

      no.

    • telescoper Says:

      Euclid is really aimed at Dark Energy rather than Dark Matter..

      • Dark Energy Says:

        After Euclid it will probably be clear that there is no such thing as
        dark energy. It will be very frustrating but many believe
        that \Lambda will still be a viable option – we will only know
        it with a higher accuracy. Emergent gravity may be
        of interest and probably gravity can not be quantised
        as it is a statistical quantity like Temperature. The other
        possibility i.e. modifying gravity is already highly constrained too
        at least on scales probed by GW detection but Euclid
        will target cosmological scales and more elaborate
        models with complicated mechanism to suppress it
        on smaller scales. Bit frustrating after Planck failed
        to detect any primordial non-Gaussianity. Probably
        cosmological equivalent of detecting top quark or
        Higgs Boson will have to wait. 21cm surveys will
        probe more interesting era but that many would consider to be
        astrophysics and not cosmology. I hope Euclid finds
        something unexpected so not everyone will switch field
        to join GW research.

  3. Dark Energy Says:

    This is Freeman Dyson’s view but then thinks Global Warming
    is man made and others point out that he doesn’t like the PhD
    system probably because he doesn’t have one.

    Still very interesting and worth watching.

    • There are a handful of examples of otherwise rational people who dispute the fact of global warming or the fact that most of it is due to human activity (note: above: you say that Dyson thinks that global warming is man-made; this isn’t the case)—James Randi is another example—, just like there are otherwise smart people who sometimes go off the deep end, such as Brian Josephson, Frank Tipler, Fred Hoyle, and so on.

      With regard to not having a Ph.D., I think that you have cause and effect reversed.

  4. […] the Euclid Consortium Meeting in Helsinki a couple of weeks ago, here are a couple of […]

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