End of Summer Rains

The rain is pouring down here in Maynooth, but this isn’t the only place to have had inclement weather today:

The picture above shows the scene this morning at Chester-le-Street in County Durham where the County Championship Division 2 match between Durham and Glamorgan was taking place. Or rather, wasn’t taking place. The game was abandoned this morning owing to a the cumulative effect of heavy rain over the last few days that allowed only 86 overs to be bowled in total over the four days.

This match being declared a draw, Glamorgan finish the season in 4th place on 167 points, missing out on promotion to Division 1 but having performed much better than last season. They were top of the table early on, but the loss of the excellent Marnus Labuschagne to Ashes duty for Australia proved a big blow and they fell back in the second half of the season. Anyway, at least they’ll probably win a few games next season, while they would undoubtedly struggle in Division 1. Lancashire finish top of the Division 2 table by a country mile, while Northants and Gloucester also go up.

I always thing of the last day of the County Championship as the end of summer. This year most of the final round of games has been hit by the weather so it’s a rather damp ending. This is also the first year in a while in which I haven’t seen any live cricket. Still, there’s always next year.

That’s basically all I have time to write about today as I’ve been running around all day – including popping into the library to give the webinar I mentioned yesterday. Moreover, at 6pm local time all the power in the building is going off and we’re to be turfed out while some repair work is done. I’ll shortly have to go round checking all the computers are switched off.

One Response to “End of Summer Rains”

  1. Phillip Helbig Says:

    I guess the post is about the end-of-summer rains (i.e. they start at the end of summer) rather than the end of the summer rains (i.e. the long period of rains stops). The hyphens almost completely reverse the meaning.

    By far the most common mistakes of style I read are missing hyphens in two-word adjectives (what has the high energy physicist been smoking?) and the word “only” being in the wrong place. Peter even did a post here on the latter. A distant third, but becoming more common, are superfluous hyphens after adverbs, e.g. a well-known scientist. Will be soon be seeing very-big boats and astoundingly-loud birds?

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