Archive for Henk Spruit

The H-index is Redundant…

Posted in Bad Statistics, Science Politics with tags , , , , , on January 28, 2012 by telescoper

An interesting paper appeared on the arXiv last week by astrophysicist Henk Spruit on the subject of bibliometric indicators, and specifically the Hirsch index (or H-index) which has been the subject of a number of previous blog posts on here. The author’s surname is pronounced “sprout”, by the way.

The H-index is defined to be the largest number H such that the author has written at least H papers having H citations. It can easily be calculated by looking up all papers by a given author on a database such as NASA/ADS, sorting them by (decreasing) number of citations, and working down the list to the point where the number of citations of a paper falls below the number representing position in the list. Normalized quantities – obtained by dividing the number of citations a paper receives by the number of authors of that paper for each paper – can be used to form an alternative measure.

Here is the abstract of the paper:

Here are a couple of graphs which back up the claim of a near-perfect correlation between H-index and total citations:

The figure shows both total citations (right) and normalized citations (left); the latter, in my view, a much more sensible measure of individual contributions. The basic problem of course is that people don’t get citations, papers do. Apportioning appropriate credit for a multi-author paper is therefore extremely difficult. Does each author of a 100-author paper that gets 100 citations really deserve the same credit as a single author of a paper that also gets 100 citations? Clearly not, yet that’s what happens if you count total citations.

The correlation between H index and the square root of total citation numbers has been remarked upon before, but it is good to see it confirmed for the particular field of astrophysics.

Although I’m a bit unclear as to how the “sample” was selected I think this paper is a valuable contribution to the discussion, and I hope it helps counter the growing, and in my opinion already excessive, reliance on the H-index by grants panels and the like. Trying to condense all the available information about an applicant into a single number is clearly a futile task, and this paper shows that using H-index and total numbers doesn’t add anything as they are both measuring exactly the same thing.

A very interesting question emerges from this, however, which is why the relationship between total citation numbers and h-index has the form it does: the latter is always roughly half of the square-root of the former. This suggests to me that there might be some sort of scaling law describing onto which the distribution of cites-per-paper can be mapped for any individual. It would be interesting to construct a mathematical model of citation behaviour that could reproduce this apparently universal property….