Archive for The Open Journal of Astrophysics

New Publication at the Open Journal of Astrophysics!

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , , , , , , , on December 2, 2019 by telescoper

We have published another new paper at The Open Journal of Astrophysics. We actually published this one last week but (presumably because of the Thanksgiving holiday) it has taken longer than usual to register the DOI with Crossref and I held off mentioning this paper here until everything was sorted.

Here is a grab of the overlay:

The authors are Farhad Feroz and Mike Hobson of the Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge (UK), Ewan Cameron (now at Oxford, UK) and Anthony N. Pettitt of Queensland University of Technology in Australia.

You can find the accepted version on the arXiv here. This version was accepted after modifications requested by the referee and editor. Because this is an overlay journal the authors have to submit the accepted version to the arXiv (which we then check against the copy submitted to us) before publishing; version 3 on the arXiv is the accepted version (which contains a link to updated software).

It is worth mentioning a couple of points about this paper.

The first is that it is mainly a statistical methods paper rather than astrophysics per se but it does contain applications to astrophysics and cosmology and, more relevantly, was posted on the `Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics’ section on the arXiv. The Editorial Board felt that we should consider it for publication because our rule for whether a paper can be considered for publication in the Open Journal of Astrophysics is stated clearly on our instructions for authors:

We apply a simple criterion to decide whether a paper is on a suitable topic for this journal, namely that if it it is suitable for the astro-ph section of the arXiv then it is suitable for The Open Journal of Astrophysics.

So far our publication list is dominated by papers in `Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics’ and `Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics’ (which is not surprising given its origin) but we would be very happy to get more submissions from other areas, especially Stellar and Planetary astrophysics. Hint! Hint!

The other point to make is that this paper actually appeared on the arXiv over six years ago and has been widely cited as a preprint but it has never previously been published by a journal. The Editorial Board felt that we should consider it for publication in order to ensure that it is properly curated and citations properly assigned, but we treated it as a new submission and sent it out for review just like any other paper. The review led to some changes and, most importantly, a few updates to the software which you can find here. The editorial process has been quite lengthy for this paper but I think we have done a valuable service to the community in reviewing and publishing this paper.

P.S. Just a reminder that we now have an Open Journal of Astrophysics Facebook page where you can follow updates from the Journal should you so wish..

New Publication at the Open Journal of Astrophysics!

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , , , , , on November 24, 2019 by telescoper

Yesterday we published another new paper at The Open Journal of Astrophysics. Here is a grab of the overlay:

The authors are Katarina MarKovic (now of JPL in California), Benjamin Bose (of the University of Geneva) and Alkistis Pourtsidou (Queen Mary, University of London).

You can find the accepted version on the arXiv here. This version was accepted after modifications requested by the referee and editor. Because this is an overlay journal the authors have to submit the accepted version to the arXiv (which we then check against the copy submitted to us) before publishing; version 2 on the arXiv is the accepted version.

I’d like to apologize to the authors for a delay in publishing this paper. It was ready to go a couple of weeks ago, but we had some trouble with an extension to the platform provided by Scholastica which was intended to register Digital Object Identifiers automatically and thus speed up the process. Unfortunately we found some bugs in, and other problems with, the new software and in the end have given up and reverted to the old manual registration process. Hopefully Scholastica will be able to offer a working system for DOI registration before too long.

Anyway, you will see that this is one for the `Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics’ folder. We would be happy to get more submissions from other areas, especially Stellar and Planetary astrophysics. Hint! Hint!

P.S. Just a reminder that we now have an Open Journal of Astrophysics Facebook page where you can follow updates from the Journal should you so wish..

Not the Open Journal of Astrophysics Impact Factor

Posted in Open Access with tags , , , on October 22, 2019 by telescoper

Yesterday evening, after I’d finished my day job, I was doing some work on the Open Journal of Astrophysics ahead of a talk I am due to give this afternoon as part of the current Research Week at Maynooth University. The main thing I was doing was checking on citations for the papers we have published so far, to be sure that the Crossref mechanism is working properly and the papers were appearing correctly on, e.g., the NASA/ADS system. There are one or two minor things that need correcting, but it’s basically doing fine.

In the course of all that I remembered that when I’ve been giving talks about the Open Journal project quite a few people have asked me about its Journal Impact Factor. My usual response is (a) to repeat the arguments why the impact factor is daft and (b) point out that we have to have been running continuously for at least two years to have an official impact factor so we don’t really have one.

For those of you who can’t be bothered to look up the definition of an impact factor , for a given year it is basically the sum of the citations in a given year for all papers published in the journal over the previous two-year period divided by the total number of papers published in that journal over the same period. It’s therefore the average citations per paper published in a two-year window. The impact factor for 2019 would be defined using citations to papers publish in 2017 and 2018, etc.

The Open Journal of Astrophysics didn’t publish any papers in 2017 and only one in 2018 so obviously we can’t define an official impact factor for 2019. However, since I was rummaging around with bibliometric data at the time I could work out the average number of citations per paper for the papers we have published so far in 2019. That number is:

I stress again that this is not the Impact Factor for the Open Journal but it is a rough indication of the citation impact of our papers. For reference (but obviously not comparison) the latest actual impact factors (2018, i.e. based on 2016 and 2017 numbers) for some leading astronomy journals are: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 5.23; Astrophysical Journal 5.58; and Astronomy and Astrophysics 6.21.

Scholastica Webinar – The Open Journal of Astrophysics Project

Posted in Maynooth, Open Access with tags , , on October 2, 2019 by telescoper

As you may know, together with Fiona Morley of Maynooth University Library, last week I contributed to this `webinar’:

If you missed the event itself then you can follow the link here to access a full recording of the webinar. You can also find a quick summary of the goings-on here.

And if all this weren’t exciting enough, here are the slides I used for my bit.

 

The Open Journal of Astrophysics: Scholastica Webinar Reminder!

Posted in Open Access with tags , on September 25, 2019 by telescoper

Just a quick reminder that tomorrow I’ll be participating in webinar (whatever that is) organized by Scholastica to do a about the Open Journal of Astrophysics, which will involved a short presentation delivered over the interwebs jointly by myself and Fiona Morley (Head of Digital Programmes and Information Systems at Maynooth University Library), followed by a question and answer session. The session will be conducted via Zoom (which is the pretty neat platform we use, e.g., for Euclid teleconference meetings).

Here is the advert:

You can sign up here.

Now I have to figure out what I should say.

New Publication at the Open Journal of Astrophysics!

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , , , , , , , on September 24, 2019 by telescoper

Yesterday we published another new paper at The Open Journal of Astrophysics, but I didn’t get time to write a post about because of teaching and other start-of-term business so I’m correcting that omission now.

 

The authors are Selim Can Hotinli  of Imperial College London (UK), Marc Kamionkowski of Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (USA) and Andrew Jaffe, also of Imperial College.

You can find the accepted version on the arXiv here. This version was accepted after modifications requested by the referee and editor. Because this is an overlay journal the authors have to submit the accepted version to the arXiv (which we then check against the copy submitted to us) before publishing; version 2 on the arXiv is the accepted version.

You will see that this is  one for the `Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics’ folder. We would be happy to get more submissions from other areas, especially Stellar and Planetary astrophysics. Hint! Hint!

P.S. Just a reminder that we now have an Open Journal of Astrophysics Facebook page where you can follow updates from the Journal should you wish..

The Open Journal of Astrophysics: Scholastica Webinar and Plan S

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , on September 13, 2019 by telescoper

Just a quick post to advertise the fact that I’ve been invited by Scholastica to do a webinar (whatever that is) about the Open Journal of Astrophysics, which will involved a short presentation delivered over the interwebs jointly by myself and Fiona Morley (Head of Digital Programmes and Information Systems at Maynooth University Library), followed by a question and answer session. The session will be conducted via Zoom (which is the pretty neat platform we use, e.g., for Euclid teleconference meetings).

Here is the advert:

You can sign up here.

While I’m on the subject(s) of Scholastica and the Open Journal of Astrophysics, I thought I’d add a bit of news about Plan S. Scholastica has been working hard behind the scenes to develop a roadmap that will enable its journals to become compliant with Plan S. The roadmap is here. Three important landmarks on it are:

  • Core machine-readable XML metadata in the JATS standard for all articles
  • Automated Digital Object Identifier (DOI) registration through Crossref
  • Automated metadata, including funding sources, deposited into major indexes and archives including DOAJ and Portico

Currently we do some of these manually for each article, and it’s nice to see that Scholastica is intending to provide these services automatically which will save us (i.e. me) a considerable amount of fiddling about!