Archive for The Open Journal of Astrophysics

New Publication at the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 24, 2022 by telescoper

It’s time once again for me to announce another new paper at the Open Journal of Astrophysics. The new paper, published yesterday, is the 12th paper in Volume 5 (2022) and the 60th in all. The latest publication is entitled “Minkowski Functionals in Joint Galaxy Clustering & Weak Lensing Analyses” and the authors are Nisha Grewal, Joe Zuntz and Tilman Tröster of the Institute for Astronomy in Edinburgh and Alexandra Amon of the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge. The paper is in the folder marked Cosmology and Non-Galactic Astrophysics.

Incidentally, Dr Alexandra Amon is the winner of this year’s Caroline Herschel Lectureship in Astronomy, so congratulations to her for that too!

The new paper is about the application of topological characteristics known as Minkowski Functionals to cosmological data. This approach has been used in the past to study the pattern cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations; see e.g. here for one of my forays into this way back in 2008. Now there are more high-quality datasets besides the CMB so there are more opportunities to use this elegant approach. Perhaps I should do a blog post about Minkowski Functionals? Somewhat to my surprise I can’t find anything on that topic in my back catalogue here In The Dark

Anyway, here is a screen grab of the overlay which includes the  abstract:

 

 

You can click on the image to make it larger should you wish to do so. You can find the accepted version of the paper on the arXiv here.

The (unofficial) 2021 Journal Impact Factor for the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , on July 16, 2022 by telescoper

Since a few people have been asking about the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) for the Open Journal of Astrophysics, I thought I’d do a quick post in response.

When asked about this my usual reply is (a) to repeat the arguments why the impact factor is daft and (b) point out that the official JIF is calculated by Clarivate so it’s up to them to calculate it – us plebs don’t get a say.

On the latter point Clarivate takes its bibliometric data from the Web of Science (which it owns). I have applied on behalf of the Open Journal of Astrophysics to be listed in the Web of Science but it has not yet been listed.

Anyway, the fact that it’s out of my hands doesn’t stop people from asking so I thought I’d proceed with my own calculation not using Web of Science but instead using NASA/ADS (which probably underestimates citation numbers but which is freely available, so you can check the numbers using the interface here); the official NASA/ADS abbreviation for the Open Journal of Astrophysics is OJAp.

For those of you who can’t be bothered to look up the definition of an impact factor for a given year it is defined the sum of the citations for all papers published in the journal over the previous two-year period divided by the total number of papers published in that journal over the same period. It’s therefore the average citations per paper published in a two-year window. Since our first full year of publication was 2019, the first year for which we can calculate a JIF is 2021 (i.e. last year) which is defined using data from 2019 and 2020.

I stress again we don’t have an official Journal Impact Factor for the Open Journal of Astrophysics but one can calculate its value easily. In 2019 and 2020 we published 12 and 15 papers respectively, a 27. These papers were cited a total of 193 times in 2021. The journal impact factor for 2021 is therefore … roll on the drums… 193/27, which gives:

If you don’t believe me, you can check the numbers yourself. For comparison, the latest available Impact Factor (2020) for Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society is 5.29 and Astronomy & Astrophysics is 5.80. OJAp’s first full year of publication was 2019 (in which we published 12 papers) but we did publish one paper in 2018. Based on the 134 citations received to these 13 papers in 2020, our 2020 Journal Impact Factor was 10.31, much higher than MNRAS or A&A.

Furthermore, we published 32 papers in 2020 and 2021 which have so far received 125 citations in 2022. Our Journal Impact Factor for 2022 will therefore be at least 125/32= 3.91 and if those 32 papers are cited at the same for the rest of this year the 2022 JIF will be about 7.5.

Who knows, perhaps these numbers will shame Clarivate into giving us an official figure?

With so much bibliometric information available at the article level there is no reason whatsoever to pay any attention to such a crudely aggregated statistics at the journal level as the JIF. One should judge the contents, not the packaging. I am however fully aware that many people who hold the purse strings for research insist on publications in journals with a high JIF. If there was any fairness in the system they would be mandating astronomy publications in OJAp rather than MNRAS or A&A.

Anyway, it might annoy all the right people if I add a subtitle to the Open Journal of Astrophysics: “The World’s Leading Astrophysics Journal”…

New Publication at the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , , , , , , on July 5, 2022 by telescoper

Time to announce another new publication in the Open Journal of Astrophysics! This one, published on Sunday, is the 8th paper in Volume 5 (2022) and the 56th in all.

The latest publication is entitled “Search for a distance-dependent Baryonic Tully-Fisher Relation at low redshifts” and is written by by Aditi Krishak (IISER-Bhopal, India) and Shantanu Desai (IIT Hyderabad, India).

This paper is in the Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics folder.

Here is a screen grab of the overlay which includes the abstract:

 

 

You can click on the image to make it larger should you wish to do so. You can find the arXiv version of the paper here.

New Publication at the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , , on February 21, 2022 by telescoper

It’s time yet again to announce a new publication in the Open Journal of Astrophysics! This one is the 3rd paper in Volume 5 (2022) and the 51st in all. We actually published this on Friday, byt I’ve only just got around to announcing it here now.

The latest publication is entitled Differentiable Predictions for Large Scale Structure with SHAMNet and is written by Andrew Hearin, Nesar Ramachandra and Matthew R. Becker of the Argonne National Laboratory and Joseph DeRose of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (both institutions being in the USA).

Here is a screen grab of the overlay which includes the abstract:

You can click on the image to make it larger should you wish to do so. You can find the arXiv version of the paper here. This paper is in our popular Cosmology and Non-galactic Astrophysics section.

P. S. Here’s a bit of feedback from the author of this paper about the referees:

They reviewed the paper in conscientious detail, and every comment was thoughtful. We feel that our paper has materially improved in clarity as a result of their critique.”

New Publication at the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , , , , on January 29, 2022 by telescoper

It’s time yet again to announce a new publication in the Open Journal of Astrophysics! This one is the 2nd paper in Volume 5 (2022) and the 50th in all. We actually published this one a couple of days ago I’ve only just got around to announcing it now.

It’s very nice to mark our 50th publication with two firsts: (1) this is the first ‘Citizen Science’ paper we have published; and (2) it is the first paper in the folder corresponding to the arXiv section on Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (astro-ph.EP).

The latest publication is entitled The CosmoQuest Moon Mappers Community Science Project: The Effect of Incidence Angle on the Lunar Surface Crater Distribution and is written by Matthew Richardson (Planetary Sciences Institute, Tucson = PSI), Andrés A. Plazas Malagón (Princeton & Astronomical Society of the Pacific=ASP; corresponding author), Larry A. Lebofsky (PSI), Jennifer Grier (PSI), Pamela Gay (PSI & ASP), Stuart J. Robbins (Southwest Research Institute) and The CosmoQuest Team.

Here is a screen grab of the overlay which includes the abstract:

You can click on the image to make it larger should you wish to do so. You can find the arXiv version of the paper here. As I mentioned above this is the first publication in the folder marked Earth & Planetary Astrophysics.

There is a nice twitter thread by the corresponding author explaining what the paper is about:

If you click on the above it will take you to the rest of the Twitter thread.

A Citation Landmark

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , on December 31, 2021 by telescoper

Just over a week ago I posted an item about the citations garnered by papers in the Open Journal of Astrophysics in the course of which I speculated on whether we would reach the 1000 mark before the end of 2021. Well, I checked on the NASA/ASD system today and it seems we have just made it:

There is still one paper we have published but not yet listed on ADS so the real number might be a little higher. It’s also possible that the figure will dip below a thousand again, at least for a short time. That is because ADS sometimes counts the citations to a published paper and to its preprint separately thus causing some duplication; when the issue is finally resolved the number of citations can go down.

Anyway, that’s a nice note to end the year on. Tomorrow we start with Volume 5 (2022)!

The Future of Publishing

Posted in Open Access with tags , , on December 22, 2021 by telescoper
Citations to papers in the Open Journal of Astrophysics

I’ve long thought that The Open Journal of Astrophysics is ahead of its time, but when I checked the citation record via NASA/ADS the other day I found corroborating evidence in the form of citations from papers published in 2022! It’s very futuristic to be cited by papers that haven’t been published yet.

I’ve actually noticed this sort of thing before. Some journals announce publications and lodge metadata well in advance of the official publication date so the citations get tracked. At the Open Journal of Astrophysics we usually publish papers within a day or two of acceptance so this doesn’t really happen to papers cited from our articles.

Notice also there are citations going back to 2014. This might surprise you since our first papers were not published until 2016. The reason is that some papers were hanging around on the arXiv accumulating citations before we officially published them.a

That deals with the Ghosts of Citations Past and Citations Yet to Come so I feel I should mention the Present situation. According to ADS, as of today (22nd December 2021), papers in the Open Journal of Astrophysics have garnered 992 citations. That’s an average of just over 20 per paper. We might just get to a thousand before the end of the year. Now that would be a nice Christmas Present!

New Publication at the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , , , , , on December 17, 2021 by telescoper

It’s nice to be able to announce another publication in the Open Journal of Astrophysics before the Christmas break. This one was published yesterday, actually, but I didn’t get time to post about it until just now. It is the 17th paper in Volume 4 (2021) and the 48th in all.

The latest publication is entitled Mapping Spatially Varying Additive Biases in Cosmic Shear Data and is written by Tom Kitching and Anurag Deshpande of the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (UCL) and Peter Taylor of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Caltech).

Here is a screen grab of the overlay which includes the abstract:

You can click on the image to make it larger should you wish to do so. You can find the arXiv version of the paper here. This is another one for the Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics folder, which is the most popular category so far on the Open Journal of Astrophysics site.

P. S. Let me apologise for any inconvenience caused by a recent temporary outage on our Scholastica platform overnight between 16th & 17th December (US time). Normal service has now been restored.

New Publication at the Open Journal of Astrophysics

Posted in Open Access, The Universe and Stuff with tags , , , , , , , on December 6, 2021 by telescoper

Time to announce yet another publication in the Open Journal of Astrophysics. This one is the 15th paper in Volume 4 (2021) and the 46th in all.

The latest publication is entitled  Interplanetary Dust as a Foreground for the LiteBIRD CMB Satellite Mission by Ken Ganga (Paris), Michele Maris (Trieste) and Mathieu Remazeilles (Santander) on behalf of the LiteBIRD collaboration. For information about the LiteBIRD mission see here.

Here is a screen grab of the overlay which includes the abstract:

You can find the paper on the Open Journal of Astrophysics site here and can also read it directly on the arXiv here.

Four Years in Maynooth

Posted in Biographical, Maynooth, Politics, Science Politics with tags , , on December 1, 2021 by telescoper

 

In recent times I’ve found myself remarking quite frequently on this blog how much the Covid-19 pandemic has played havoc with my perception of the passage of time, and I come to reflect on that again now that today (1st December 2021) marks four years since I started work at Maynooth University. So much has happened in that period it seems very much longer since I first arrived here.

I started off working part-time here in Maynooth and part-time in Cardiff, commuting once a week to and fro across the Irish Sea until July 2018. That was a very tiring experience that brought it home very forcefully that I don’t have anywhere near as much energy as I did when I was younger.

I won’t deny that the past four years have had their frustrations. The teaching and administrative workload, especially since I became Head of Department in 2019, and even more so since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020, has been very heavy and has made it difficult to be very active in research. That’s not helped by the lack of opportunities for funding in basic science, thanks to what I believe to be a very short-sighted policy on research funding by the Irish government.

On the other hand, I have great colleagues and the students are very engaged. There are few things in life more rewarding than teaching people who really want to learn.

I hadn’t realized when I arrived in Ireland that it would take the best part of three years to find somewhere permanent to live, but I managed to buy a house in the summer of 2020. I am very happy here despite the continuing restrictions due to the pandemic.

The thing I’m probably most proud of over the past four years is, with the huge help of staff at Maynooth University Library, getting the Open Journal of Astrophysics off the ground and attracting some excellent papers. Hopefully that will continue to grow next year.

I am also proud of having played a part in the successful application for a new SALI Chair which we will be advertising formally in the new year. That is just one of many new developments on the horizon here at Maynooth, which suggest the next few years should be very exciting for physics and astronomy at Maynooth.

So, after a few years of hard and at times dispiriting slog, things are definitely looking up. Meanwhile, in Brexit Britain, events have turned out exactly as I predicted:

The referendum campaign, followed by the callous and contemptuous attitude of the current UK Government towards EU nationals living in Britain, unleashed a sickening level of xenophobia that has made me feel like a stranger in my own country. Not everyone who voted `Leave’ is a bigot, of course, but every bigot voted for Brexit and the bigots are now calling all the shots. There are many on the far right of UK politics who won’t be satisfied until we have ethnic cleansing. Even if Brexit is stopped the genie of intolerance is out of the bottle and I don’t think it well ever be put back. Brexit will also doom the National Health Service and the UK university system, and clear the way for the destruction of workers’ rights and environmental protection. The poor and the sick will suffer, while only the rich swindlers who bought the referendum result will prosper. The country in which I was born, and in which I have lived for the best part of 54 years, is no longer something of which I want to be a part.

In other words I don’t regret for one minute my decision to leave Britain.

P.S. After I finish my term as Head of Department next year I am eligible for a sabbatical, so if anyone fancies playing host to an old cosmologist please let me know!

P.P.S. Solidarity to all my colleagues in UK universities who are, from today, taking part in strike action against pension cuts and deteriorating working conditions.